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Recommended Libraries in Tokyo

As a student, one of the activities you can do while studying is studying in the library. Apart from being able to change the learning atmosphere, libraries also provide many books and journals that we can use to increase our knowledge.

In Tokyo, there are several libraries that you can visit to study, do assignments, or just read books.

What’s going on? Come on, listen and keep reading Lotrlibrary.com!

The International Library of Children’s Literature

Image source: stroll-tips.com

The International Library of Children’s Literature (ILCL), a branch of the National Diet Library (NDL), is a national library dedicated to children’s books, providing internationally connected library services for children’s literature published in Japan and abroad . Founded in January 2000, ILCL opened to the public partially the following May and began full service in May 2002. Based on the philosophy “Children’s books connect the world and unlock the future” ILCL serves three basic roles namely a library dedicated to children’s books, a place where children find books, and a children’s book museum.

ILCL collects, stores, and makes available a wide variety of Japanese and foreign children’s books and related materials. By conducting surveys and research as well as providing professional training and information, it also supports various programs related to children’s books and reading. ILCL consists of two buildings, the Brick Building which has a gallery, museum and open reading room for children, where adults and children can enjoy various children’s books, and the Arch Building which has a Researcher Reading Room and Seminar Room to provide specific information about children’s literature.

National Diet Library

Image source: britannica.com

The National Diet Library or in Japanese called Kokuritsu Kokkai Toshokan is Japan’s national library which was formed in Tokyo in 1948 and combines the libraries of the assembly and the Diet (national legislative body) with the collections of the former Imperial Library (founded in 1872). This library building was opened in 1961, adjacent to the National Diet Building. And it is organized around the US Library of Congress system, serving legislators and the nation at large through various major divisions and 35 branch libraries.

The main collection contains more than six million book volumes. The library serves as the headquarters of the Japan Special Library Association and the International Book Exchange Center. The law stipulated that all Japanese publications be deposited in the library, and this became the basis for the computer-generated national bibliography of Japan, which was published by the library.

Tokyo Metropolitan Library

Source: library.metro.tokyo.lg.jp

The Tokyo Metropolitan Central Library is a very quiet place to hide and read or work. The library has ample seating space, free wifi, an extensive book and media collection, and an affordable cafeteria with beautiful views. The library is hidden on the east side of Arisugawa-no-miya Memorial Park, near Hiro-o.

Opened in 1973 at its current location, the Tokyo Metropolitan Central Library is one of Japan’s largest public libraries, holding a collection of over 2.06 million books, as well as audio-visual materials, magazines, journals, and rare items such as Japanese history. . picture. About 12% of the collection is foreign books, divided into Western (64%), Chinese (27%), and Korean (9%). Books are organized by subject, not by language, meaning books in English or other foreign languages ​​can be found alongside Japanese texts.

The collection covers a wide range of subjects including philosophy, history, social sciences, natural sciences, technology, engineering, industry and commerce, fine arts, languages ​​and literature. The Exhibition Corner on the ground floor displays books about Japan, its culture and the upcoming 2020 Tokyo Olympics. The library does not have children’s or young adult books. Books and media in the library collection can only be consulted on site, not to be checked out and taken home.

Free WiFi is available throughout the building, with no time or usage restrictions and the network is quite fast, with an average speed of around 140 mbps. Additionally, seating is available on all five floors of the Tokyo Metropolitan Central Library. The seats in the Central Hall and Exhibition Corner on the ground floor have good natural lighting. and has beautiful garden views. There is a Group Study Room on the fifth floor, as well as a Research Room, where you can reserve individual desk space.

The library has more than 30 online databases, nine of which have English versions. The library has an impressive collection of foreign newspapers, including the Financial Times, The Japan Times, The New York Times, The Straits Times, The Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, Le Monde, Die Zeit, Izvestiia, and El. Pais, as well as a number of Japanese publications. Editions from the last three months are available in paper version on the ground floor and older editions are kept in closed stacks or available on microfilm. On the third floor, sections C44-C50 reconstitute Foreign Language Literature; in this section you will find Japanese and Western literature available in non-Japanese languages.

Chiyoda City’s Hibiiya Library and Museum

Source: tripadvisor.com

The Hibiya Library & Museum is located in Hibiya Park near the Imperial Palace and opened as a venue about the history and culture of Edo, Tokyo in 2011. With all of the Yonbancho History Museum’s holdings transferred to the new museum, the museum holds various exhibitions and seminars, and promotes property preservation policies culture in Chiyoda City.

In the main exhibition on the first floor, we can understand the history of Chiyoda City with the theme “The Founding and Development of Edo”. Among them, the Edo Castle exhibition, entitled “Planning of the Shogun’s Fortress”, we can also see the history of Chiyoda with archaeological artifacts, drawings and a resource retrieval system with a tablet computer.

In the archaeological exhibition, we can see about the construction of the castle and the planning of the castle town by the Shogun. We can see the condition of the Honmaru Goten from excavated Chinese ceramics stored in the castle, and a hollyhock-marked back end tile for the Honmaru Goten that was burned to the ground by the Great Fire of Meireki in 1657.

Tokyo University Library

Image source: schoolynk.com

The University of Tokyo Library consists of 3 libraries, namely the Public Library on the Hongo Campus, the Komaba Library on the Komaba Campus, the Kashiwa Library on the Kashiwa Campus, and 32 departmental libraries in all faculties of the University. The entire collection includes more than 9 million books, 168,000 journals, and various digital resources, such as databases, electronic journals, and e-books.

The Public Library, which serves students and faculty on all campuses, has approximately 1.2 million books and 1,144 seats, making it the largest of the 3 libraries. The current building was built in 1928 with a donation from John D. Rockefeller, Jr. after the old building was completely destroyed by the Great Kanto Earthquake. The grand, red-carpeted staircase, sculpted arches and other striking fixtures give the library a grand atmosphere.

The Komaba Library opened in October 2002 as the main library of the Komaba Campus. It features corridors that let in natural light, a spacious lounge, has 1,075 seats, and holds around 600,000 books covering a wide range of subjects. As the first University library used by undergraduate students. This library also functions as a research library for students and postgraduate students as well as providing many services to support the various levels of education and research at the Komaba Campus.

Kashiwa Library is the newest library, becoming fully operational in February 2005 after a limited opening in May 2004. The current book collection numbers approximately 430,000 books, and has an automated stack room capable of holding one million volumes holding natural science journals. The library’s media hall, community salon, and other facilities for group activities also make it a hub for intra-campus exchange and interaction with the local community.

These are some of the libraries in Tokyo, Japan! Which library would you like to try visiting? Write in the comments, OK!

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